Emotions, Motivations, and Action in Contact  – Talks Session 2

Emotions, Motivations, and Action in Contact  – Talks Session 2

Chair: Fiona Barlow

Tabea Hässler: Multinational study on contact and support for social change

AUTHORS’ LIST

Daniel Valdenegro (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile), Michelle Bernadino (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile), Chile Ruth Ditlmann (Berlin Social Science Center, Germany), Roberto González (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile), Nurit Shnabel (Tel-Aviv University, Israel), Colette van Laar (University of Leuven, Belgium), Emilio Paolo Visintin (University of Lausanne, Switzerland), Linda Tropp (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA), Dominic Abrams (University of Kent, UK), Anna Lisa Aydin (Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany), Jorina von Zimmermann (University College London, UK), Stephen Wright (Simon Fraser University, Canada), Simone Sebben (University of Zurich, Switzerland), Hana Oberpfalzerova (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic), Adrienne Pereira (University of Lausanne, Switzerland), Hema Selvanathan (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA), Michal Bilewicz (University of Warsaw, Poland ), Pelin Gul (University of Kent, UK), Olga Kuzawinska (University of Warsaw, Poland), Nóra Lantos (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary), Sabine Otten (University of Groningen, Netherlands), Mario Sainz (University of Granada, Spain), Jonathan Cook (The Pennsylvania State University, UK), Lisa Droogendyk (Sheridan College, Canada), Luiza Mugnol Ugarte (The Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil), Evgeny Osin (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia), Michael Pasek (The Pennsylvania State University, USA), Marija Brankovic (University of Belgrade, Serbia), Iris Žeželj (University of Belgrade, Serbia), Edona Maloku Bërdyna (RIT Kosovo, Kosovo), Roberto Baiocco Sapienza (University of Rome, Italy), Orly Bareket (Tel-Aviv University, Israel), Dinka Corkalo Biruski (University of Zagreb, Croatia), Maneeza Dawood (Columbia University in the City of New York, USA), Angélica Herrera Loyo (ETH Zurich, Switzerland), Margareta Jelic (University of Zagreb, Croatia), Kaltrina Kelmendi (RIT Kosovo, Kosovo), Anna Kende (Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary), Masi Noor (Keele University, UK), Jessica Pistella Sapienza (University of Rome, Italy); Andreas Glenz (University of Zurich, Switzerland)

SHORT ABSTRACT

This preregistered study spanning 10,977 participants from 23 countries found that contact is associated with more support for social change among advantaged group, but with less support among disadvantaged groups. Moreover, satisfaction of group-specific needs was positively associated with support among all groups. Yet, specification curve analysis revealed variability in effect sizes.

Mariska Kappmeier: Building trust: Does positive contact help to overcome distrust in the police?

AUTHORS’ LIST

Mariska Kappmeier (National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies; University of Otago, New Zealand)

E-mail: Mariska.kappmeier@otago.ac.nz

SHORT ABSTRACT

Can positive contact between police and minority members improve distrustful relations predicted by the perceived bias of the police? This research, conducted in the USA, surveyed three neighborhoods of different racial compositions, regarding their trust and experience in the police. It was found that non-racial bias could be ameliorated through positive contact, but not perceived racial bias.

Ángel Gómez: Identity fusion moderates the effect of negative contact on intergroup orientations

AUTHORS’ LIST

Ángel Gómez (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED, Spain), Alexandra Vázquez (Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, UNED, Spain), William B. Swann Jr. (University of Texas at Austin, USA)

E-mail: agomez@psi.uned.es

SHORT ABSTRACT

Identity fusion -a visceral feeling of oneness with a group- predicts extreme pro-group behavior that represent efforts to protect the ingroup rather than harm the outgroup. Five studies provide evidence that strongly fused only display negative orientations toward the outgroup when they perceive a threat to the group in the form of negative types of intergroup contact.

Giovanni A. Travaglino: Contact, culture and criminal groups: Endorsement of masculine honour predicts contact with criminal organisations in Italy

AUTHORS’ LIST

Giovanni A. Travaglino, (School of Humanities and Social Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, China), Lisbeth Drury (Department of Organizational Psychology, Birkbeck, University of London, UK).

E-mail: GATravaglino@cuhk.edu.cn

SHORT ABSTRACT

Italian criminal organisations (COs) draw legitimacy from values of masculinity. We examine these values’ role in contact with COs. Across three studies, we demonstrate that individuals’ endorsement of masculinity is associated to more frequent contact with COs. Such contact plays a role in demobilising opposition against COs. Contact Theory may play an important role in explaining COs’ role in society.