Negative Contact and Valence Asymmetries – Talks Session 3

Negative Contact and Valence Asymmetries – Talks Session 3

Chair: Stefania Paolini

Sarina J. Schäfer: Dynamic contact effects: an individual’s history influences effects of positive and negative intergroup contact. Results from a behavioural game

AUTHORS’ LIST

Sarina J. Schäfer (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany),

Jaspers Eva (Utrecht University, Netherlands), Kros Mathijs (Utrecht University / ICS, The Netherlands), Hewstone Miles (the University of Newcastle, Australia and Oxford University, UK), Christ Oliver (FernUniversität in Hagen, Germany)

E-mail: sarina.schaefer@fernuni-hagen.de

SHORT ABSTRACT

To examine the effects of a history of positive and negative intergroup contact on subsequent effects of valenced contact, participants played several rounds of a behavioural game with in- and outgroup members. We used models from the Dynamic-Structural-Equation-Model framework to address changes in contact experiences within and between individuals over time.

Nicola Sheeran: Predicting attitudes towards teen mothers: The role of positive versus negative contact

AUTHORS’ LIST

Nicola Sheeran (Griffith University, Australia), Alana Bess (Griffith University)

E-mail: N.sheeran@griffith.edu.au

SHORT ABSTRACT

Attitudes towards teen mothers are pervasive and unfavourable and contact has been an inconsistent predictor. We considered whether the nature of the contact (i.e., positive versus negative) predicted attitudes, hypothesising that negative contact would be a better predictor due to valence-salience effects. Contact predicted feelings towards teen mothers, with positive contact, but not negative, significantly predicting feelings and beliefs.

Timothy Lang: The relative frequency of positive and negative contact: A meta-analytic test of general trend and context-sensitivity from an ecological outlook

AUTHORS’ LIST

Timothy Lang (the University of Newcastle, Australia),

Stefania Paolini (the University of Newcastle, Australia), Miles Hewstone (the University of Newcastle, Australia and Oxford University, UK), Kylie McIntyre (the University of Newcastle, Australia), Oliver Christ (Fern University in Hagen, Germany)

E-mail: Timothy.Lang@uon.edu.au

SHORT ABSTRACT

Through a meta-analysis of published research we assessed the relative frequency of positive (vs. negative) contact and moderation by contact type, country-level government orientation, media market concentration, and economic inequality. Preliminary findings detected an overall positive valence asymmetry in prevalence that is more pronounced for direct (vs. indirect) contact, in countries that have greater media pluralism, and are economically unequal (not equal)