Developmental and Intimacy-Building Processes in Contact – Talks Session 5

Developmental and Intimacy-Building Processes in Contact – Talks Session 5

Chair: Fiona White

Rachel Maunder: Reducing internalised stigma with intergroup contact

AUTHORS’ LIST

Rachel Maunder (University of Sydney, Australia), Fiona White (University of Sydney, Australia)

E-mail: rachel.maunder@sydney.edu.au

SHORT ABSTRACT

Intergroup contact is typically used to reduce prejudice between groups. However, positive contact with members of one’s own group has the potential to reduce internalised prejudice – the prejudice members of stigmatised groups direct towards themselves. We consider the mechanisms that might underlie this process, discuss preliminary research in relation to internalised mental health stigma, and suggest directions for future research.

Michael Thai: Cross-group friendships are associated with outgroup attraction


AUTHORS’ LIST

Michael Thai (Griffith University, Australia)

E-mail: m.thai@uq.edu.au

SHORT ABSTRACT

The present research investigates whether cross-group friendships are associated with increased romantic and sexual attraction to outgroup members. White Australian participants (N = 240) reported their friendships with and attraction to members of six racial/ethnic outgroups. Results showed that greater friendships with members of each racial/ethnic outgroup consistently predicted greater attraction to that outgroup.

Marco Marinucci: Modulating responses to chronic social exclusion: How inter/intra-group social contacts shape asylum seekers’ responses

AUTHORS’ LIST

Marco Marinucci (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy), Paolo Riva (University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy)

E-mail: m.marinucci@campus.unimib.it

SHORT ABSTRACT

In this study, we recruited a sample of asylum seekers and investigated how their social contacts with the hosting population and within their national group moderate the relation between experiences of chronic exclusion and feelings of resignation. Results suggest that different degrees of social contact in the two networks influenced the link between experiences of exclusion and negative psychological outcomes.

Kiara Sanchez: From contact to content: Perceptions of race conversations within interracial friendships

 AUTHORS’ LIST

Kiara Sanchez (Stanford University, USA),

David Kalkstein (Stanford University, USA), Greg Walton (Stanford University, USA)

E-mail: klsanch@stanford.edu

 SHORT ABSTRACT

Across three studies, we found 1)Black adults were less comfortable disclosing race-related experiences to White friends as compared to Black and other-race friends, even friends of equal closeness, and 2)White adults who imagined a Black friend disclosing race experiences (v. non-race experiences) felt less comfortable but more socially connected. Ongoing work examines Blacks’ perceptions of Whites in such conversations.